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The Internal Revenue Service is still working on the details of how it is going to help taxpayers that may have fallen for deceptive marketing that led them to improperly receive employee retention tax credits.


The IRS has announced that calendar year 2023 would continue to be regarded as a transition period for enforcement and administration of the de minimis exception for reporting by third party settlement organizations (TPSO) under Code Sec. 6050W(e).


The IRS has released the annual inflation adjustments for 2024 for the income tax rate tables, plus more than 60 other tax provisions. The IRS makes these cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) each year to reflect inflation.


The 2024 cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) that affect pension plan dollar limitations and other retirement-related provisions have been released by the IRS. In general, many of the pension plan limitations will change for 2023 because the increase in the cost-of-living index due to inflation met the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. However, other limitations will remain unchanged.


The IRS reminded taxpayers who may be entitled to claim Recovery Rebate Credit (RRC) to file a tax return to claim their credit before the April-May, 2024 deadlines. It has been estimated that certain individuals are still eligible to claim RRC for years 2020 and 2021. The deadlines to file a return and claim the 2020 and 2021 credits are May 17, 2024, and April 15, 2025, respectively. Additionally, the IRS reminded that taxpayers must first file a tax return to make their RRC claims irrespective of income slab and source of income.


The Internal Revenue Service is looking to improve its customer service metrics as well as improve its technology offerings in the coming tax filing season.


The Internal Revenue Service announced the launch of the first phase of rolling out business taxpayer accounts, as well as enable taxpayers to respond to notices online.


People are buzzing about Roth Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs). Unlike traditional IRAs, "qualified" distributions from a Roth IRA are tax-free, provided they are held for five years and are made after age 59 1/2, death or disability. You can establish a Roth IRA just as you would a traditional IRA. You can also convert assets in a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.

Yes, but only for a limited time. In late December 2009, Congress passed the 2010 Defense Appropriations Act (2010 Defense Act). The new law temporarily extends the eligibility period for COBRA premium assistance through February 28, 2010 and the duration of the subsidy for an additional six months (up to 15 months).

The first-time homebuyer tax credit has proven to be one of the most popular tax incentives in recent years. Until recently, the credit was generally limited to "first-time homebuyers." Although the full ($8,000) is still limited to "first-time" homebuyers, "long-time" homeowners of the same principal residence may be eligible for a reduced credit of $6,500. This new provision can give a boost to younger homeowners looking to trade up, or simply move on from their current home, as well as seniors looking to downsize.